Home > DocuBase > Article

« All DocuBase Articles

 

Saturday, 23rd January 2016

Internet Fragmentation: An Overview

Source: World Economic Forum

From Executive Summary:

A growing number of thought leaders have expressed concerns over the past two years that the Internet is in some danger of splintering or breaking up into loosely coupled islands of connectivity. A number of potentially troubling trends driven by technological developments, government policies and commercial practices have been rippling across the Internet’s layers, from the underlying infrastructures up to the applications, content and transactions it conveys. But there does not appear to be a clearly defined, widely shared understanding of what the term, fragmentation, does and does not entail.

The growth of these concerns does not indicate a pending cataclysm. The Internet remains stable and generally open and secure in its foundations, and it is morphing and incorporating new capabilities that open up extraordinary new horizons, from the Internet of Things and services to the spread of block chain technology and beyond. Moreover, the increasing synergies between the Internet and revolutionary changes in other technological and social arenas are leading us into a new era of global development that can be seen as constituting a fourth industrial revolution. But there are challenges accumulating which, if left unattended, could chip away to varying degrees at the Internet’s enormous capacity to facilitate human progress. We need to take stock of these, and to begin a more structured dialogue about their nature, scope and distributed collective management.

The purpose of this document is to contribute to the emergence of a common baseline understanding of Internet fragmentation. It maps the landscape of some of the key trends and practices that have been variously described as constituting Internet fragmentation and highlights 28 examples.

+ Direct link to Report (PDF; 1.5 MB)


Category:

Source:


Having begun his career in academic libraries, Adrian Janes has subsequently worked extensively in public libraries, chiefly in enquiry work as an Information Services librarian. In this role he has had particular responsibility for information from both the UK Government and the European Union. He wrote a detailed report on sources for the latter which was published by FreePint in 2007, and has contributed articles to FreePint and ResourceShelf. He is involved in training in information literacy and the use of online reference resources.

A Contributing Editor to DocuTicker, he also write reviews for Pennyblackmusic.

More articles by Adrian Janes »



Please note: DocuTicker's editors collect citations for full-text PDF reports freely available on the web but we do not archive these reports. When you click a link to find and/or download the report, you are leaving the DocuTicker site. DocuTicker makes no representations regarding the ongoing availability of any report or any external resource. Links were accurate as of the date of posting.

« All DocuBase Articles







 

 
 
 

Article Categories

All Article Categories »

Sources

All DocuBase Sources »

Source Categories

All Source Categories »

Archive

All Archives »