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Wednesday, 27th February 2008

Crime, Corrections, and California: What Does Immigration Have to Do with It?

Crime, Corrections, and California: What Does Immigration Have to Do with It?
Source: Public Policy Institute of California
From press release:

Immigrants are far less likely than the average U.S. native to commit crime in California, according to a report released today by the Public Policy Institute of California. Significantly lower rates of incarceration and institutionalization among foreign-born adults suggest that longstanding fears of immigration as a threat to public safety are unjustified.

Key findings in the report, Crime, Corrections, and California: What Does Immigration Have to Do with It?:

  • People born outside the United States make up about 35 percent of California’s adult population but represent only about 17 percent of the state prison population.
  • U.S.-born adult men are incarcerated in state prisons at rates up to 3.3 times higher than foreign-born men.
  • Among men ages 18-40 – the age group most likely to commit crime – those born in the United States are 10 times more likely than immigrants to be in county jail or state prison.
  • Noncitizen men from Mexico ages 18-40 – a group disproportionately likely to have entered the United States illegally – are more than 8 times less likely than U.S.-born men in the same age group to be in a correctional setting (0.48% vs. 4.2%).

+ Full Report (PDF; 1.3 MB)


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